Posts tagged wrap up
Wrap Up | April 2019
20190501__RKR4501_002.jpg

Michaela

*some links are affiliate, and we deeply appreciate your support

We moved this month, so my reading life was seriously back burnered. Fun YA audiobooks were the extent of my reading, and I expect May to basically be Agatha Christie audiobooks and maybe a real novel or two!

The Raven King | Maggie Stiefvater- The final book in The Raven Cycle. It wasn’t as strong as some of the other books in the series, but it wrapped everything up satisfyingly enough. I really, really enjoyed this quartet and these characters. If you want some really sweet YA with beautifully written characters and a twist of magic, these are your books.

When Dimple Met Rishi | Sandhya Menon- Pure, unadulterated cuteness. I’d probably classify this as New Adult, and it was just an adorable love story with some bigger themes mixed in without much subtlety. I’d say this is a definite step up from standard YA romance fare; not exactly a literary masterpiece, but enjoyable enough.

20190501__RKR4490_001.jpg

Rikki

The Octopus Museum: Poems | Brenda Shaughnessy - I had little expectation when going into this book, and while there were a few stand out poems in here, the book overall was a hodgepodge and moved toward a political tone that I really did not care for.

Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Murder | Cutter Wood - I needed a break from some heavier books I was reading, and this was a nice shift. Overall, this book wasn’t really for me, but I will say that Wood is clearly an intelligent man, albeit, a curious one, and wove together his personal life leading up to this story in an interesting manner.

Pretending is Lying | Dominique Goblet - This was such a nuanced story, that I should honestly read this a few more times before talking about it. But, it was so unique and so well done (especially for a graphic novel) that I could see much of the depth of the story being overlooked without realizing it. Very well done.

Americus | M.K. Reed - Another great graphic novel that somewhat dramatically portrayed mothers and their teens and the power of our words and actions in relation to our children, but also to what we choose to believe in or not. In this case, the story specifically centered around two teen boys and one of the moms freaking out over a book series and pushing to ban it, without knowing the real story. There were also snippets of the story in question throughout, and I found that to be a really fun and interesting parallel to the main character’s struggle with morals and relationships.

Letters to a Young Poet | Rainer Maria Rilke - I absolutely loved this small collection of letters and wish that I could’ve read some of the work the achieving poet was writing to Rilke. Either way, there is such simplistic and grand advice, not just for writing, but for life. It was a seemingly candid and beautiful insight to a very intelligent man and writer. Also, I need a pen pal.

Still Life | Louise Penny - I’ve been meaning to read Penny for ages, as she’s so well loved in the book community. This cozy murder mystery was a fun break from my usual stack, and it’s a page-turner that I sort of enjoyed. I’m not hopping on the Louise Penny train anytime soon, and I certainly don’t feel compelled to read on in the series. But I do now want to revisit some old favorite cozy mysteries authors again.

Did you read anything you loved this month?