Wrap Up | September 2018

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Michaela

P.S I Still Love You | Jenny Han - Pretty much everyone has read this series at this point, it seems, and there isn’t much new to say about it. I think it’s warm and cozy and good light fun, but I still think Lara Jean’s voice sounds too juvenile. Shrug. These are cute, but I’m having a hard time feeling motivated to read the third one.

Howls’s Moving Castle | Diana Wynne Jones - A nostalgic re-read for me, because it’s a childhood favorite and one I repeatedly come back to. I love Howl’s for it’s humor, wonderful characters, and warmth, but I am not an impartial judge at this point— it’s been a staple in my life for too long. I know this is sacrilege to some, but while I love them both, I think I like the movie just a tad more! This was a re-read I desperately needed in my life this month since I was disappointed with so many of the books I read or tried to read, and it helped buoy me up.

Where the Crawdads Sing | Delia Owens - Get out your pitchforks…because I DNF this one. I made it about 200 pages, and while I could see it was well written and was telling it’s story well, I am just not the reader for it. I am not at all drawn to this kind of story, and that’s okay. I passed it over to Rikki, and I’m reasonably sure she is going to absolutely love it. Thanks to Putnam for gifting us a review copy.

Passing for Human | Liana Finck - This is another book (well, graphic memoir) that I am just not the right reader for. It’s doing something very specific, and very trendy with it’s style, but I am just not someone who enjoys it. I also see what the message was supposed to be, but I think it could have been better executed. Thanks to Random House for the complimentary review copy.

Fun Home | Alison Bechdel - And yet another book that was not for me! Hooray! Fun Home falls into the category of “I can see that this is good, but I don’t like it” It’s well executed, it has a clear intention and is well layered, but I did not enjoy reading it. Part of it is that pseudo-grief memoirs, especially when they are wrestling with the death of a parent, are hard for me, but part of it was just…again I am not the right reader for this style.

The Picture of Dorian Gray | Oscar Wilde - Another much needed re-read, because Oscar Wilde never disappoints. This book is full of Wilde’s particular brand of wit and humor while tackling some deeper philosophy and darker themes. It’s cynical and dazzling in equal measure, with gorgeous prose and well constructed ideas. If you’ve never read any Wilde, do yourself a favor and pick him up; he’s nothing short of mesmerizing to read.

There There | Tommy Orange - This book really reminds me of Junot Diaz, except Orange is being a lot more straightforward than Diaz, if that makes sense; there’s less nuance and reading between the lines required. I sincerely enjoyed it though, and it was certainly one of the best books I’ve read recently. I think the use of multiple perspectives is interesting and well done, with the right amount of connection between them. Also the ending was a little shocking, even though I expected it, and the lack of closure ultimately served the story well. Thanks so much to Knopf for gifting us a review copy.

 

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Rikki

The Witch of Blackbird Pond | Elizabeth Speare George - This month’s buddy read with my oldest, I would have so appreciated this book more at a younger age. Nonetheless, still a charming book, especially to share with your children. (side note from Michaela: I read this as a kid and really loved it!).

Cinder | Marissa Meyer - So many people recommended this book as another buddy read for my oldest, and it fit the bill perfectly. I enjoyed it much more than anticipated and he’s in the middle of reading it and liking it as well.

The Kitchen House | Kathleen Grissom - A long awaited read, I loved this book. A fictional, yet realistic look at life for an orphan girl and the servants of a plantation. The story follows the orphan girl through the majority of her life and through the relationships she makes. It’s very well done.

The Picture of Dorian Gray | Oscar Wilde - This book is excellent! It’s full of satire and often crude offbeat humor. For being written in the late 19th century, it’s even more brilliant than one might realize at first!

The Penderwick’s | Jeanne Birdsall - I’ve been meaning to read this book for some time, wondering if my kids would like it as well. It’s a darling story of four sisters on their summer vacation, and I can’t wait to pass it off to my daughter!

White Oleander | Janet Fitch - I loved this book. It’s a beautifully written portrayal of a girl navigating life after her mother murders a former lover. Astrid comes of age and learns to navigate life, learn the not-so-pretty person her mother is, and in certain small ways, I was able to relate to many aspects of her struggles. The book ended as it should have; a closed chapter of her life, not an ending.

GUEST REVIEWER

Nicole | @nicoleviolabooks

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Hello, fellow Ardent Biblio readers! I'm Nicole, a renaissance mama, and a reader with a deep abiding love for YA lit. I also enjoy classics and chick lit (is that still a term?), middle grade, light sci-fi, and I'm trying to venture into fantasy. I take my time with non-fiction and memoir, but I generally blow through fiction. I'm currently a bit burnt-out on historical fiction and I've finally come to terms with the fact that despite studying literature in college and grad school, I'm just not drawn to literary fiction or books with heavier themes. I'm currently writing a YA novel and querying another and also homeschool my kids part-time and cheer for lots of sports games. You can find me online at nicolevbennett.com.


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Daddy-Long-Legs | Jean Webster - This book has been waiting on my Kindle for years, ever since I read one of my favorite books, Dear Mr. Knightly (a retelling of it by Katherine Reay). Well, the original did not disappoint; I thoroughly loved Daddy-Long-Legs! The narrator is quirky and clever, and her humor still holds up over a hundred years after the book was written. Written in an easy, epistolary style (which I always love), this book was simply a delight for me.

The Cafe by the Sea | Jenny Colgan - I'm a big Jenny Colgan fan and loved this story, which, while reminiscent of some of her other books, drew me right in, thanks to its heartwarming story and atmospheric setting on a fictional Scottish island. I loved how she wove strands of Scottish lore and culture into the story, and of course, Jenny Colgan sure knows how to weave in a good romance (or two) as well. I'm ready to take a trip to Scotland and to the fictional Endless Beach now!

Renegades | Marissa Meyer - When I find an author I love, I become a loyal reader. Since I loved the Lunar Chronicles so much (it was my first real foray into anything sci-fi), I was drawn to Renegades simply because of who wrote it (that, and its eye-catching cover!). I've never read any superhero stories before but really liked this one. I can't wait for the next book in the series to come out in November! The different super powers in the book were crafted so creatively, and my eight-year old son kept sneaking the book away from me to re-read the cast of characters and their powers in the front of the book. I love the questions about society that this book raises, too. 


What did you read and love this month?