Hot New Releases and Their Backlist Twins

So often, I find myself seeing the same five books over and over again on Instagram, as the hot new releases hit and everyone scrambles to read them, but so often I think about the backlist titles that tie in perfectly with the month's hot new release. 

So, If you loved....

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo | Taylor Jenkins Reid...

The Thirteenth Tale, by Diane Setterfield has a nearly identical premise. A reclusive, dying author hires a relatively unknown Biographer, Margaret to tell her life story.  Old world glamour, family secrets, and the mysterious ties that bind them together abound in this novel, just as they do in The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

Sweetbitter | Stephanie Danler...

If you liked the peek behind the scenes of restaurant life, try Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain. Bourdain gives a no bullshit look into the world of restaurant kitchens and the people who work in them. Where Danler's writing can come off as pretentious, Bourdain comes off as sharply hilarious, so if the writing was an issue for you, but you liked the story, definitely try Bourdain. 

If We Were Villains | M. L. Rio...

The obvious choice here, is The Secret History, by Donna Tartt. If you liked If We Were Villains, The Secret History is just a more powerful, magical, and infinitely better written version and you should read it immediately. Basically, an elite band of nerdy friends + the murder of one of their own + college campus. The same formula, just much, MUCH better.

The Dry | Jane Harper...

If you liked the small town meets murder mystery with a cast of unique characters, check out Louise Penny's Inspector Gamache series beginning with Still Life. A much deeper dive into great characters and a small town you want to go live in, but full of creepy vibes, brilliant writing, and interesting, well thought out mysteries. 

When Dimple Met Rishi| Sandhya Menon...

If you want a deeper, more adult look at some similar dynamics at play, pick up Jhumpa Lahiri's The Namesake. The son of immigrant parents, Gogol makes his way through relationships with various women, including one his parents arranged. The two biggest contrasted relationships in the book are one with a rich American girl and one with another chid of Indian immigrants who wants nothing to do with tradition. Sound familiar?

What books have you been seeing a ton of lately? Seen any that have backlist twins? We'd love to hear!